Tagged: politics

Choosing Sides? In the Aftermath of Violence, there are no Winners

In the wake of the Charlottesville, VA protests, one thing has become crystal clear:

  • 14596954857_9eb1e2905d_zOne side is motivated by fear, which leads to anger, anger to hate.
  • One side throws around emotionally-charged language, calling the other side traitors to America.
  • One side refuses to give any ground, refuses to honestly hear the other side out.
  • One side sees the other as everything that’s wrong with this country. If only that side would leave America, she would be truly great again.
  • One side has been trying to “white-wash” history for years.
  • One side is just itching for another Civil War.
  • One side is on a witch hunt, ready to destroy complicated people over voicing their opinions and utilizing their civil right as Americans to freely speak out without fear of repercussions.
  • One side can’t or won’t see that where and how the other side lives plays a big role in that side’s opinions on politics, etc.
  • One side’s idealism is the most important thing to them, higher than the people who make America great (i.e. Americans), higher than the laws that make America safe, higher than any religious precepts of peace. The idea, and not the reality, is the number one thing.
  • One side resembles fascism in it’s complete devotion to the idea, and the utter destruction (so far verbally, reputation-wise, financially) of anyone who even appears to question it. There is no neutrality in this side’s eyes, how much less room is there for all sides?
  • One side is more than willing to resort to violence as a catalyst for change, “if necessary.”
  • Will one side stop at nothing for their ideal America to be realized? That remains to be seen.

Which side am I talking about? If you only see one side or the other, you are part of the problem. United we stand, divided we fall.

IMG_9200_1a_watermark

The grave is never satisfied.

Shiny People

I love, and am attracted to, shiny objects. Midnight stars, colorful beads, glassware, crystals, the sun glinting off water. In a similar fashion, much of humanity is attracted to shiny people, but be warned: All that glitters is not gold.

IMG_7055_watermark

Pyrite (Fool’s Gold), original photo by Loura Lawrence

Shiny people and their audience tend to trounce logic and reason to the hurt and chagrin of everyone, but especially logical people. There is no room for them at the inn, because they are most likely to tell people exactly what they don’t want to hear, that the shiny person’s foundation is not solid rock but weak infrastructure, and too many people are gathering on the balcony. Such wet blankets are forced out of the happy group, to wander in seclusion.

Shiny people dress in literally shiny outfits with lots of glitter, sequins, bright colors, and power suits. They surround themselves with plenty of actual shiny objects, the more over-the-top the better (golden toilets, for example). Shiny people love a good show, and their audience loves a good show too. That’s entertainment.

Shiny people seem to know inherently how to charm others (or blind them) with their glitz and glamour, and those who love it are like moths to a flame. Just like the basic biology concept of symbiosis, the one can’t exist without the other. Audience and performer all share a high of sensationalism, surrealism, excitement, and mystery.

This isn’t about one-time performances in which you leave on a high note with the thought, “That was fun! I’d like to do that again, someday,” but “Wow! I can’t wait to see what they do next!” Once an audience member has invested some time and money into a shiny person, the superior feeling they get from being associated with them is nigh impossible to break. It takes a personal catastrophe (others’ tragedies involving the shiny person in question, can be reasonably explained away) to shock an audience member back into reality.

Shiny people are like the fusion reactor in Spider-Man 2 (2004); they build their glow and following slowly, but soon they are radiating like the sun with thousands or millions of followers. The more energy they receive from their crowds, the hotter and brighter and more unstable shiny people become, until they finally explode. An explosion from a shiny person necessarily heaves debilitating, even deadly (financial, emotional, spiritual, relational, even sometimes physical) shrapnel to their unsuspecting crowd. And just like Doc Ock’s fusion reactor, the moment a shiny person loses all control is typically unpredictable.

On Snowflakes

Conservative political supporters have come up with a new, derogatory name for those who disagree with them: Snowflakes. Conservatives view dissenters as “weak” and easily broken. Because of their “delicate” nature, they are likened to snowflakes.

As if being “strong” (which never lasts) is the be-all, end-all of life.

As if looking and sounding just like everyone else is the beautiful goal.

Snow may be delicate, and what’s wrong with that? Snow is beautiful! Snow is magical! Snowflakes dance, snowflakes bring joy and pleasure, snowflakes are fun! Winter is a total drag without snow, and our favorite winter movies, songs, and memories (even for conservatives) are all centered around white Christmas’s, sledding, and raucous snowball fights. My happiest thoughts of snow revolve around winter mornings, when all the snowflakes sparkle in the early light. I love hearing the crunching sound of boots on packed snow. But snow can also be powerful.

img_4225_1a_watermark

When winter comes, and cold winds howl and chill too deeply, that is when snowflakes are flung about. They do not melt then, they do not break. They sting, they blind, they pile up and block traffic, work, and school. Deep snow is hard to get around in and hard to move. Still, the hardest snow is best for sledding and skiing.

Snow is only delicate in hot weather, which only lasts for a season. And winter is coming.

*If you liked this post, please consider subscribing to my blog for just $1.50/month.

Be Careful What You Wish For

timeI’ve seen a lot of people, particularly Christians, calling for unity and forgiveness on both sides now the election is over (and they won). The onus is on you, dear people, to offer peace and friendship. For a year or more, you’ve made it clear to half the population of America that “you don’t want ___ here.” Now you are offended they believe you and want nothing to do with you?

At the same time, I keep reading statements on FB, on news sites, on blogs, etc. which include terms like, “butt-hurt” (awful term!), “libtards”, “distasteful among us”, “snowflakes”, etc. How do you expect to heal wounds this way? Or do you really expect to heal wounds at all? It’s handing a peace offering with one hand, while hiding a dagger in the other, then feigning being upset/not understanding when those who feel the full weight of unkindness turn away so they don’t get stabbed. Again.

This is not Christian talk or behavior, it is the lowest treachery. Yet this kind of abuse goes on endlessly (and has for years) in churches and so-called Christian families. You want to know why younger people are staying out of church? This is it. And then you call them immoral and overly sensitive, and consider them “worthy” of more insults.

wasteland_cutAny criticism at all or difference of opinion, then most people (from any side) turn away or lash out. That’s what happens when a party feels the slightest bit threatened or out of control. But to those who feel they won Wednesday morning, it is on you to show genuine friendship, love, and care, if you indeed feel those things, to especially those who believe your words and your vote:

That you don’t really want them in your churches, your neighborhood, your city, your state, your country. That you would be far better off without them. That you would be overjoyed to see them go.

Be careful what you wish for.